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‘CHIFLADAzine’: Bratty New Zine is Inclusive and Important

July 14, 2014

chiflada

“Chiflada means ‘crazy’ or ‘bratty’ in Spanish,” explains Claudia Cardona, editor-in-chief of the newly established CHIFLADAzine.

In January, when the St. Mary’s student and aspiring filmmaker decided that she wanted to create a new zine, she had difficulty deciding on a title that was wholly inclusive. Several months later, when brainstorming with co-founder and co-editor Laura Christine Sinner, they settled on the thematically-appropriate “Chiflada” and the zine was born.

At first, the name may seem slightly strange for a zine about inclusion, but the reasons behind its selection show how perfectly fitting it is.”We took the idea that people of color are typically viewed as “bratty” because they want representation in media,” says Claudia. “Criticisms of the lack of diversity are usually fought with statements like ‘You’re selfish if you want to see yourself in media’ or ‘If you want diversity, go ahead and make your own show/movie.’ So we turned this idea into our own collective of latin@s (the @ symbol is used to make the word gender neutral and inclusive of everyone, she explains)  to express their unique capabilities.”

In times when popular zines like Rookie Mag seemed unbearably whitewashed, Claudia and her collaborators decided to found their own medium of expression. “We started the magazine because we started to realize that there was a huge lack of latin@ voices in mainstream culture, especially zines. We wanted to provide a place for our voices, opinions, writings, and art because we believe that our representation is crucial.”

At the current time, CHIFLADA exists only on the internet. As submissions are gathered for each themed monthly issue, they are posted once on Mondays, and twice on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays until the issue is completed.  Concerning the future of the magazine, Claudia and the CHIFLADA staff aim to expand into material circulation. “We want to print a copy of our first two issues for the end of the summer, but we’re not sure yet if we will do a physical copy. If we do, we’ll try to sell them at First Friday or other art events.”

Although only three months old, the infant magazine has enjoyed a wide readership across the country due to its promotion through Tumblr and other social media channels. As it continues to grow, Claudia has high hopes for CHIFLADAzine’s future. “Hopefully, I want to host events for CHIFLADA in different places across the U.S. and meet various readers, artists, and writers who support the zine. I also want to come out with a yearly print edition for sale as well.”

CHIFLADA is now accepting submissions for their August issue, themed “EL FIN,” as August signifies summer’s last full month and ending. For more information, follow CHIFLADA on Twitter, browse its Facebook page, or check out CHIFLADA’s website to read up on submission guidelines.

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  • lou g

    Times have changed. When I came to San Antonio for basic training in 1957, I first heard the term chiflada, or chiflado. But it wasn’t about people of color, but more about spoiled folks that adored attention. This didn’t mean they were bad, or, better than thou folks, but, perhaps a little full of themselves because other folks heaped praise on them.

  • Kat

    Rookie Mag isn’t whitewashed. There are many voices of color within the Rookie community as a whole. They also include men and trans people of all ages. Its actually very diverse if you bother to read it and keep up with the collective as a whole. Tavi and Petra are Jewish but not everyone is “white”.